photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
Product Focus
 
Evolution5
25-5-8 20kg
A high quality Spring lawn fertiliser with controlled release for upto 5 months

From £28.99
> more details

 

Spring Lawn Care

Spring Lawn Care

Many people say the lawn makes a garden special, so it makes sense to keep it looking as good as it can be. As we come out of winter, the soil gradually warms up and we start to see the first signs of growth. 
 
The lawn may be showing the signs of winter stress – usually seen as yellowed leaf tips. These can be ‘topped off’ with the first mowing when conditions allow. I prefer to use a rotary mower for the first few cuts, as the cutting height can be adjusted more easily to take off only the very tips of the leaf blades. Do not mow when the ground is too moist, as you could make the surface uneven.
 
Moss Control
Now is the time to deal with any moss that has crept in over the autumn and winter months. Moss gets a hold when the grass growth is reduced to a minimum by low levels of light and temperature in conjunction with periods of high moisture and humidity.
 
Where moss is a problem, apply Lawn Sand at (1 x 25kg bag for every 360m² of lawn) or Greentec Mosskiller Pro from the third week of March onwards. Do not apply Lawn Sand when frost is forecast within 4 days of the proposed treatment. Lawn Sand will turn the moss black and once this happens the dead moss needs to be scarified out using a spring tine rake.
 
It is probably better to leave the scarification for 7 days after application to ensure it has done its job completely. If you have weeds and moss in the lawn then there are proprietary brands of fertiliser available to the amateur gardener which contain weed and moss treatment on the granule.
 
Aeration / Scarification
While the soil under the lawn is still moist, it is worth carrying out some light aeration using a garden fork or a specialised aeration tool.  This will open up the soil to allow vital gaseous exchange that needs to occur in the roots and can also assist in drainage.  On larger lawns a spiking machine would be a good idea (purchase or hire).
 
The spring is also a good time to scarify the lawn to remove dead roots, shoots and weeds. Use a spring tine rake (or a solid tine rake for more vigorous treatment). Better still, use a scarification machine to achieve good results with less effort.
 
Lawn Seeding / Repairs
Once all the aeration and scarification work has been done, over-seed any bare patches of lawn with a quality grass seed mix that is similar to the original composition of the lawn. (See grass seed section).
 
For example, use a mix without ryegrass where there was none in the original lawn. Protect re-seeded areas from birds by covering with a suitable guard. [TIP You can purchase a small roll of 45cm plastic garden netting and make up tube guards 6 to 12” in diameter – these are simply held together by weaving  a single garden cane through the mesh and pushing it a couple of inches into the lawn to secure – they are then easy to move whilst mowing].  
 
As an alternative to seeding, you could purchase a few turves of similar quality to your lawn from a local supplier – but keeping the lawn level when using turves requires more skill.
 
Mowing
Once spring is well under way you need to start regular mowing – at least once a week. 
 
It is important not to mow too close; we recommend keeping the height of cut between 15 and 25mm (⅝ to 1”) for normal domestic lawns. When grass is regularly cut short, the plant reacts by reducing the rooting depth in order to balance its housekeeping. In addition, in hot dry periods the longer leaf blades in lawns kept at this recommended height will help to shade the roots from the sun and this greatly reduces the amount of water the lawn needs to remain healthy. 
 
Always aim to collect the grass clippings efficiently and put them on the compost heap (or re-cycle through your local authority where garden waste is collected) – as this will reduce the amount of food you are providing to the casting worms that reside under your lawn!
 
Worm Casts
Worm casts appear in the spring when the soil is moist and warmed up sufficiently to encourage worms  to come to the surface from their deep burrows. The casts can provide a nutritious compost for weed seeds that might drop in from the air or from defecating birds so it is best not to leave them undisturbed.
 
Sweep the casts with a stiff broom, once the sun has dried them, and redistribute the soil over the lawn. If possible, try to sweep up casts before you mow.
 
Feeding The Lawn
In this season we switch to the spring & summer fertilisers to provide the correct amount of nutrition required for the increased growth.  See our guide: ‘How to choose the right fertiliser''.
 
Spring and summer fertilisers have higher levels of nitrogen often combined with lower phosphate and potash.The first feed in the spring should contain less nitrogen than a full blown summer fertiliser but more than an autumn/winter product.
 
Remember to water in any granular fertiliser immediately it is applied. This will ensure that the product is gently washed down away from the turf surface and removes any fertiliser dust that can cause spotting if left on the leaf surface. Just a couple of minutes spray with a garden hose will suffice.